Course Descriptions

pippettes

Details and agendas of curriculum courses

Current Curriculum

Students who entered after September  2021 complete the Current Curriculum.

MMG1111H: Graduate Seminars I (MSc Seminars)

(0.0 FCE)

MMG1111 is the MSc seminar series. The primary goal of MMG1111 is providing practical experience and guidance so students can concisely communicate their research results to an audience of educated, but not necessarily specialist, peers. This is an essential skill for anyone intending to seek a career in scientific research. Completion of this course is mandatory for all graduate students in the program. A secondary goal is to give each student broad knowledge of all aspects of research undertaken in the department. A tertiary goal is giving students experience in listening to scientific seminars and constructively critiquing others’ research. 

Instructors: Drs. Richard Collins, Alan Davidson, Scott Gray-Owen, C.C. Hui, Lucy Osborne, Laurence Pelletier, Daniel Schramek, Ian Scott, Lincoln Stein

Course Time and Dates: Winter Tuesdays 1-2 pm 

MMG1112H: Graduate Seminars II (Ph.D. Seminars)

(0.0 FCE)

MMG1112 is the Ph.D. seminar series. The primary goal of MMG1112 is providing practical experience and guidance so students can concisely communicate their research results to an audience of educated, but not necessarily specialist, peers. This is an essential skill for anyone intending to seek a career in scientific research. Completion of this course is mandatory for all graduate students in the program. A secondary goal of the series is to give each student broad knowledge of all aspects of research undertaken in the department. A tertiary goal is to give students experience in listening to scientific seminars and constructively critiquing others’ research.

Instructors: Richard Collins, Xi Huang, Ran Kafri, Kenichi Okamato, Miguel Ramalho-Santos

Course Time and Dates: Fall Tuesdays 2-4 pm 

MMG1113H: Presentation Skills

(0.25 FCE)

This course entails a seminar presentation in front of a small group of students (~15) and professors (2). At the first meeting of the series, the course coordinator will give a seminar highlighting some of the specific challenges encountered by the types of data and arguments frequently presented in molecular biology seminars. The coordinator and the students will identify commonly made mistakes and discuss ways to avoid them. 

In subsequent weeks, students will meet in small groups of ~15 students. Attendance at every session is mandatory. Each week, 3 or 4 students will present a 15-minute seminar based on their current graduate research and critique the seminars of others. Two professors will also be in the room to help organize, encourage discussion, and evaluate the presentations. Each presenter will be given a set time, uninterrupted, to present the seminar. After the seminar, a typical critique session consists of the presenter running through their presentation again (slide-by-slide), with comments and constructive suggestions from the evaluators (initially the students, then the faculty) being provided at appropriate places. The group will try to identify what makes a “good” slide “good” and how to revise and improve the less effective slides. It is expected that opinions will vary among evaluators, and it will be helpful for everyone to hear a range of opinions. 

For each seminar, each evaluator will provide written feedback on the form provided. This feedback will be provided anonymously to the presenter to help them revise their seminar for presentation to the department in the second academic term. 

Instructors: Richard Collins, Course will also involve additional MoGen faculty (2 faculty per small group discussions).

Course Time and Dates:  Thursday 10 am – 12 pm; 5 weeks in September-October; specific dates will be announced in the preceding summer.

MMG1114H: Graduate Student Presentation I (M.Sc. Presentation)

(0.25 FCE)

MMG1114 is the MSc/Ph.D. second-year student seminar presentation. The primary purpose of MMG1114 is to give students experience in presenting their research to a larger audience of their peers. Students will present their seminars in the 2nd year of their graduate program. The primary goal of the Student Seminar Courses is providing practical experience and guidance so that students can concisely communicate their research results to an audience of educated, but not necessarily specialist, peers. This is an essential skill for anyone intending to seek a career in scientific research. Completion of this course is mandatory for all graduate students in the program. A secondary goal is to give each student a broad knowledge of all aspects of research undertaken in the department. A tertiary goal is to provide students with experience listening to scientific seminars and constructively critiquing others’ research.

Instructors: Richard Collins, Alan Davidson, Scott Gray-Owen, C.C. Hui, Lucy Osborne, Laurence Pelletier, Daniel Schramek, Ian Scott, Lincoln Stein

MMG1115H: Graduate Student Presentation II (Ph.D. Presentation)

(0.50 FCE)

MMG1115 is the Ph.D. student seminar presentation. The primary purpose of MMG1115 is to give students additional experience in presenting their research in greater depth to a larger audience of their peers. Students will present a seminar in their 4th or 5th year of the Ph.D. program. The primary goal of the Student Seminar Courses is providing practical experience and guidance so that students can concisely communicate their research results to an audience of educated, but not necessarily specialist, peers. This is an essential skill for anyone intending to seek a career in scientific research. Completion of this course is mandatory for all graduate students in the program. A secondary goal is to give each student a broad knowledge of all aspects of research undertaken in the department. A tertiary goal is to provide students with experience listening to scientific seminars and constructively critiquing others’ research.

Instructors: Richard Collins, Xi Huang, Ran Kafi, Kenichi Okamato, Miguel Ramalho-Santos 

Course Time and Dates: Fall Tuesdays 3-5 pm

 

 

Core Curriculum

Students who entered after September 2019 and before September 2021 complete the Core Curriculum.

MMG1001H– Foundational Genetic Approaches I

(0.5 FCE)

This course is offered during the Fall term. Students who enter the program in September will take this course first, followed by MMG1002 in the Winter term, while students who enter in January will complete MMG1002 (Winter term) first, then complete MMG1001 in the Fall term of their first year. MMG1001 is composed of three five-week core modules held two hours/day on MWF: 1.

Genetics Unit: Instructor and Course Coordinator, Dr. Howard Lipshitz 

Genomics Unit Instructor: Dr. Tim Hughes 

Proteins/Proteomics Unit Instructor: Dr. Anne-Claude Gingras 

Each module will have its own assignments and format. Marks achieved in each module will be used to calculate the final grade. 

MMG1002H – Foundational Genetic Approaches II 

(0.5 FCE)

This course is offered during the Winter term. MMG1002 entails two parts, Colloquium and one Computational module. 

Course Coordinator: Dr. Philip Kim


1. Departmental Colloquium (formerly MMG1010)

The Colloquium consists of ~ ten weekly departmental seminars that invited world-class scientists will present. The seminars are open to the entire department and run from 3-4 pm every Monday afternoon. Before each seminar, students read a set of 2-3 designated papers/reviews recommended by the invited seminar speaker to familiarize them with the topic at hand. Students will also meet in small groups of about 10-15 members before each seminar to discuss the research papers and develop a set of questions to submit to the seminar speaker before the seminar. After attending the seminar, students meet with the seminar speaker as a class to discuss the research (4-5 pm). This course provides first-year graduate students with the opportunity to develop important skills in evaluating scientific research while learning about a broad range of research areas from experts in each field.

Instructors: Drs. Tae-Hee Kim, Julie Lefebvre, Philipp Maas, Julien Muffat, Sagi Abelson


2. Introduction to Programming 

This course is for students with an introductory level or no previous programming knowledge.

Instructors: Drs. Philip Kim and Gary Bader.

or

3. Advanced Computational Biology I

This course is for CBMG students and other students with advanced computational experience.
In their first year, CBMG Students are also required to complete:

Instructors: Drs. Fritz Roth and Kieran Campbell. 


4. Advanced Computational Biology II (0.25 FCE)

This course fulfills one of two Modules required for MMG1041 and is required for CBMG students.

Instructors: Drs. Fritz Roth and Kieran Campbell

MMG1041H – Topics in Molecular Genetics II 

(0.5 FCE)

This requirement is completed only by Ph.D. students and entails two Modules (0.25 FCE each). The final grade is the average of the marks obtained in each course. Discuss with your Supervisor which courses would be best to take before signing up. No waivers are considered.

STUDENT SEMINARS:

In addition to formal classes, students also complete several seminar courses in which they develop their scientific communication skills.

MMG1011H – Student Seminar I

(0.5 FCE)

MMG1011 entails attendance at department-wide student seminars throughout year 1 in the program, plus a small group seminar presentation. Marks are derived from the attendance grade and the presentation. The presentation takes place in September-October after at least ten months in the program and entails a seminar presentation in front of a small group of students (~15) and professors (2). This seminar series provides students with experience in preparing and presenting a research seminar that effectively conveys their science to an audience of their peers. Students will also be expected to give constructive and critical feedback to their fellow student presenters.

Course Coordinator: Dr. Richard Collins 

MMG1021H – Student Seminar II

(0.5 FCE)

MMG1021 entails attendance at department-wide student seminars throughout year 2 in the program, plus a department-wide seminar presentation in the winter term of year 2. Marks are derived from the attendance grade and the presentation. This course is usually broken into two parallel sessions, in which 2-3 students speak each week. Students will also be expected to give constructive and critical feedback to their fellow student presenters.

Course Coordinators: Richard Collins, Alan Davidson, Scott Gray-Owen, C.C. Hui, Lucy Osborne, Laurence Pelletier, Daniel Schramek, Ian Scott, Lincoln Stein

MMG1031H – Student Seminar III

(0.5 FCE)

MMG1031 is required only for Ph.D. students and entails attendance at department-wide student seminars plus a department-wide seminar presentation in year 4. Marks are derived from the attendance grade and the presentation. Students will also be expected to give constructive and critical feedback to their fellow student presenters. Note that no topic course is required to successfully complete MMG1031. Students are enrolled in MMG1031 upon registration in the Ph.D. program. Students admitted directly into the Ph.D. program will begin the requirements of this course only after completing MMG1011, MMG1021 AND passing their qualification exam. Students complete MMG1031 in the year when they present their Ph.D. seminar.

Course Coordinators: Drs. Richard Collins, Xi Huang, Ran Kafri, Kenichi Okamoto, Miguel Ramalho-Santos

 

 

Legacy Curriculum

Students who entered the program in or before January 2019 must complete the Legacy Curriculum.

MMG1010: Molecular Genetics Colloquium (No longer offered. The colloquium is a part of MMG1002 in the Core Curriculum)

This is a mandatory course for all Molecular Genetics M.Sc. and Ph.D. students to be completed during the fall term of the first year of graduate study. The Colloquium consists of ~12 weekly departmental seminars that invited world-class scientists will present. The seminars are open to the entire department and run from 4-5:15 pm every Monday afternoon. Before each seminar, students will read a set of 2-3 designated papers/reviews recommended by the invited seminar speaker to familiarize them with the topic at hand. Students will also meet in small groups of about 10-15 members before each seminar to discuss the research papers and develop a set of questions to submit to the seminar speaker before the seminar. After attending the seminar, students will meet with the seminar speaker to discuss the research. This course provides first-year graduate students with the opportunity to develop important skills in evaluating scientific research while learning about a broad range of research areas from experts in each field. 

MMG1012: Topics in Molecular Genetics I

Students must take two topics (0.25 FCE each) in order to complete this course. The mark in this course is the average of the two marks obtained in the topics taken. Courses from other departments cannot replace this course.

MMG1015: Seminar (No longer offered. MMG1011 and MMG1021 take the place of MMG1015 in the Core Curriculum)

Students must give two research seminars and attend the weekly student seminars to obtain a grade for this course. The grade in this course is the average of the grades obtained in the two seminar presentations, minus any marks deducted for poor attendance. See the “Student Seminar Courses” (MMG1114, MMG1115) for a detailed course description.

MMG1016: Topics in Molecular Genetics II

Students must take two topics (0.25 FCE each during the Ph.D. program). The mark in this course is the average of the two marks obtained in the two topics taken. The student may replace this course with a half course offered by a different department or by a course offered through collaborative programs. Courses taken to replace MMG1016H° must be approved by e-mail by the Graduate Coordinator, and a course replacement form must be submitted prior to taking the course.

MMG1017: Topics in Molecular Genetics III

Students must take one topic (0.25 FCE), deliver one 18 minute research seminar, attend seminars, and evaluate 30 student seminars. The mark in this course is the average of the student seminar mark (minus any letter grade deduction due to poor attendance) and the topic course mark. See Student Seminars and the Graduate Handbook for more information, and Seminar Schedules for the monthly and yearly schedules. Courses from other departments cannot replace this course.

 

More Information

Courses offered by other Departments

One topic/module offered by the Department of Biochemistry or other graduate departments can be combined with an individual Molecular Genetics topic to complete MMG1012H/MMG1016H/MMG1017H upon approval by the student's supervisor and the Graduate Coordinator. Students must submit a Topic Replacement Form to the Graduate Program Administrator before the commencement of the topic. Additional topics/modules may be taken upon approval but will not count towards the degree requirement. Students from the Department of Molecular Genetics must follow the topic enrollment procedures of the host department.

Failing a Course

The School of Graduate Studies requires students to complete all graduate courses with at least a B- or 70% grade. Failure to achieve a mark of 70% or greater in any required course may terminate the student's enrollment in the program. If a student fails a course, a Supervisory Committee must hold a meeting to decide whether the student is allowed to continue in the program. An Examination Committee member must be present at this meeting. If the student is allowed to remain in the program, they must repeat the failed course. The School of Graduate Studies requires that both the grade in the failed course and the grade in the repeated course be recorded on the student's transcript.

Undergraduate Courses

Our graduate students may take undergraduate courses at the University of Toronto free of charge, with the written permission of their supervisor. Graduate students taking undergraduate courses must fill out an Add/Drop Course(s) form (available on the SGS website), obtain signatures from their supervisor and the course instructor and bring the form to the Graduate Program Administrator before the course add deadline.